People, Places, Business

4,000 people find jobs

4,000 people in SW Wales find jobs with help from Workways

New figures show that over 4,000 people in South West Wales have found jobs with the help of the South West Workways project.

This important milestone provides additional good news to a recent report by the Centre for Economic and Social Inclusion which found that "Workways is performing well against its key outcome targets, with high levels of satisfaction from participants and employers, and an excellent employment-outcome rate."

Workways helps jobseekers overcome the barriers which prevent them from finding employment. The project is backed by the European Social Fund through the Welsh Government and is led by Neath Port Talbot Council in collaboration with Bridgend, Carmarthenshire, Pembrokeshire and Swansea Councils.

Participants receive help with job applications, CVs, interview techniques, personal development and access to training. Where appropriate, they also undertake paid temporary jobs with local employers to help them gain the experience needed to find long term employment. This is a particularly successful part of the project as 64% of participants who undertake a temporary job move into permanent employment at the end of their contract.

Workways also provides recruitment support for local companies by advertising vacancies to its pool of job ready participants, shortlisting candidates, organising recruitment days and exploring business support avenues. Since 2009, the project has been in contact with 4905 businesses across South West Wales.

Marjorie Bartlett, Workways Regional Project Manager, said "This is another important milestone for Workways. The achievement is a testament to the hard work of the Workways team and the jobseekers we have supported."

Councillor Ali Thomas, Leader of Neath Port Talbot Council said "Congratulations to Workways and all the people across South West Wales who have found jobs with the support of the project. Workways provides invaluable support to jobseekers across South West Wales."